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Purchase a Redfield Rebel Binocular, Get a $25 Rebate

January 31, 2013

Purchase a Redfield Rebel Binocular, Get a $25 Rebate

Consumers who purchase a pair of Redfield Rebel binoculars between Feb 1, 2013, and March 31, 2013, can get a $25 rebate from Redfield.

Easy to handle and lightweight, Rebel binoculars feature fully multicoated lenses and premium BAK4 prisms for outstanding image brightness, resolution and edge clarity. They have a fully armored black polycarbonate body to ensure durability, and are nitrogen filled to make them waterproof and fog proof in all field conditions.

The ergonomic roof prism design of the Rebel binoculars reduces bulk and weight. The 8x42mm model weighs only 24.2 ounces and measures 5.8 inches in length, while the 10x50mm model weighs 30 ounces and is 6.7 inches long.

Twist-up/down eyecups comfortably accommodate users with or without eyeglasses. Each binocular comes with a tripod adaptable mount, soft case, neoprene neck strap and lens covers.

All Rebel binoculars are covered by the Redfield “No Excuses” Warranty. For more information, visit www.redfield.com or call 877-798-9686.  Rebate details can be found at rewards.redfield.com.

Read and join the discussion on Purchase a Redfield Rebel Binocular, Get a $25 Rebate at OutdoorHub.com.

Survival-savvy Quail Dress Eggs Up in Camo

January 22, 2013

Survival-savvy Quail Dress Eggs up in Camo

Hunters aren’t the only ones that recognize the value of good camouflage, it has become a necessary component of survival for a species of quail. A new study published in Current Biology suggests that Japanese quails have developed a knack for strategically placing their eggs in environments that make the best use of shell coloring to outwit passersby. As bird hunters can attest, quails can be quite cunning.

Quail eggs are tasty snacks for a variety of predators, so their shells have adopted a spotty, dirt colored pattern. Not all the eggs are uniform in color and some receive less pattering than others, leaving them vulnerable against darker environments. The study by George Lovell and his team reveal that Japanese quail use this to their advantage, placing the lighter colored, less patterned eggs in similar-looking backgrounds, while darker, spottier eggs are placed near dark soil.

Lovell and his fellow researchers tested this theory by offering pregnant quails several shades of sand to lay eggs on, and whenever the spotting covered more than 30% of the shell, the quail chose the darker colors to nest. This kind of camouflage is termed “disruptive coloration,” not unlike the camo that many hunters sport. The pattering serves to disrupt the outline of the egg, fooling any would-be breakfasters.

Japanese, or coturnix, quails hatch from their eggs at about two and a half weeks.

Read and join the discussion on Survival-savvy Quail Dress Eggs Up in Camo at OutdoorHub.com.

New Jersey Fish and Wildlife Application for Smartphones Now Available

January 7, 2013

New Jersey Fish and Wildlife Application for Smartphones Now Available

The Department of Environmental Protection has launched a new mobile phone application designed to provide information and technology to guide and enhance users’ hunting, fishing and wildlife watching experiences, and to provide added safety and enjoyment for outdoor enthusiasts at all of New Jersey’s wildlife management areas, state parks and forests, and other public open spaces.

“This is part of the Christie Administration’s continuing effort to bring more people into our state parks and wildlife areas, to enhance offerings and make it easier and more convenient for our residents to enjoy the great diversity of fish and wildlife and outdoor recreation opportunities in New Jersey,’’ said DEP Commissioner Bob Martin.

The free Pocket Ranger New Jersey Fish and Wildlife application is a cutting-edge mobile app that provides on-the-spot information on the state’s fish and wildlife species along with extensive mapping of public open spaces, showing and providing site information on access points for hunting, fishing, boating and wildlife watching.

Pocket Ranger has social networking capabilities, and provides an advanced map-caching feature that allows users to continue to navigate even if mobile service is lost. In addition, advanced GPS technology allows users to keep track of where they are, how far they’ve gone and to mark favorite hunting spots, fishing holes or wildlife sightings.

The application also has a Friend Finder feature that allows users to keep track of the location of friends and family. As an added safety utility, Pocket Ranger has an alert feature that notifies select contacts of your GPS coordinates in the event of an emergency. The application has many other features including weather information, a real-time calendar of events, rules and regulations, and important permit and licensing details.

“This exciting new app, along with the State Parks app, provides our residents and visitors with great tools to make their outdoor experiences even more enjoyable and memorable,’’ said Dave Chanda, DEP’s Division of Fish and Wildlife director. “This application has features that are valuable to anyone interested in the outdoors in New Jersey from the novice sportsperson learning how and where to hunt and fish to the most seasoned wildlife watcher looking for rare species information.”

In future versions of the app already under development, users will be able to submit rare species sightings and connect after a fruitful day in the field sharing, commenting, and comparing what they saw or harvested through online message boards, including a “trophy case’’ for proud anglers and hunters.

The application is compatible with both Apple and Android mobile devices. Links for downloading either version are provided at http://www.pocketranger.com/apps/nj-fw/apps.php.

“Our expectation is for the Pocket Ranger Fish and Wildlife Guide to encourage a new generation of users to explore and discover all that New Jersey has to offer in the way of fish and wildlife related recreation,” said ParksByNature co-founder and program coordinator Brett Melillo. “This robust mobile app will enhance the outdoor experience, raise awareness about New Jersey’s incredible outdoor resources and help maintain the license revenues necessary to maintain and improve the state’s fish and wildlife populations.”

The DEP will receive a portion of advertising revenues generated by the application, which is bring provided to the Department at no cost.

Read and join the discussion on New Jersey Fish and Wildlife Application for Smartphones Now Available at OutdoorHub.com.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Outdoor Report for Nov. 15

November 15, 2012

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Outdoor Report for Nov. 15

Wisconsin’s regular nine-day gun deer season opens this Saturday, and with one of the earliest openings possible, reports from around the state are indicating white-tail bucks are still in rut, or the breeding season. A few areas are reporting the rut is past peak, but many locations are reporting bucks are still actively moving in pursuit of does.

The Department of Natural Resources is ramping up social media to connect with the public on the excitement and traditions of season. Seasoned hunters, new hunters, and those interested in learning more about hunting in Wisconsin can take part in online chats, a new wildlife-focused blog, special facebook posts and a facebook photo contest centering around Wisconsin’s rich hunting tradition, and a “tweet-along” with DNR conservation wardens.

Hunters looking for a place to hunt have the opportunity to enjoy access to more than 43,000 acres of private land open to the public within close proximity of the state’s metropolitan areas. A new video captures the success of the Voluntary Public Access program in opening up large tracts of prime habitat land, often connected to public land, for multiple outdoor recreational activities. People can find private lands open to hunting through this program by searching keyword VPA on the DNR website.

In addition, more than one million acres of private forest land is open to hunting through the Managed Forest Law and Forest Crop Law. DNR launched a new online mapping application that makes it easier for people to find lands open to hunting under these programs. Finally, more than four million acres of county, state and federal public lands are open to hunting. People can find links to information about all these lands through a new Voluntary Public Access feature page that is part of a 2012 deer hunt feature on the website that kicked off with a video greeting from Gov. Scott Walker and DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp on how Wisconsin is making it easier to introduce family and friends to Wisconsin’s great deer hunting traditions, including reduced license fees for first time hunters and people who haven’t hunted in the last 10 years..

Also, hunters with smart phones now have an easier way to be sure when hunting hours open and close where they are hunting with a new DNR Sunrise/Sunset app that can be purchased for just 99 cents.

People can get the latest news and information by following DNR on Twitter twitter.com/WDNR. From Nov. 17- 25 there will be live-feed tweets and images from a ride-along with a DNR conservation warden to reveal interesting events and insights into the deer hunt that many of us never see.

Last weekend’s rain and strong winds slowed waterfowl hunting activity some, but there continue to be a few more reports of northern diving ducks moving into the state, along with increasing numbers of migratory Canada geese. Pheasant hunting has been good, and the last of the stocking on public hunting grounds will take place over the next few weeks.

People putting up winter bird feeders are seeing juncos, chickadees, goldfinches and purple finches and even some early pine grosbeaks.

Read and join the discussion on Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Outdoor Report for Nov. 15 at OutdoorHub.com.

Explore the Life of Indiana’s Game Birds at Ellettsville Library, Nov. 27

November 13, 2012

Explore the Life of Indiana’s Game Birds at Ellettsville Library, Nov. 27

Monroe Lake naturalist Jill Vance will present a program on game birds called “Quail, Pheasant, Grouse: The Life of a Game Bird” at the Ellettsville Branch of the Monroe County Public Library on Tuesday, Nov. 27 at 6:30 p.m.

Vance will discuss the lifestyles of three game birds—pheasant, ruffed grouse, and bobwhite quail—and discuss how reservoir biologists manage habitat to keep these birds happy and healthy.

Because all three game birds are in season right now, Vance will also touch on Monroe Lake hunting locations and state regulations during the 45- to 60-minute program.

The Ellettsville Library is located at 600 W. Temperance St. in Ellettsville. Questions about this program should be directed to Vance at (812) 837-9967 or jvance@dnr.IN.gov.

Read and join the discussion on Explore the Life of Indiana’s Game Birds at Ellettsville Library, Nov. 27 at OutdoorHub.com.

Swans Migrate into Utah Marshes

November 6, 2012

Swans Migrate into Utah Marshes

More than 14,600 counted on Oct. 30

Tundra swans are visiting some new areas as they migrate into Utah this fall.

For years, the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge west of Brigham City has been “the” place to go to take or see a swan in the fall. And that hasn’t changed. The refuge is still a great spot to hunt and view swans.

But when Blair Stringham flew a survey on Oct. 30, the refuge wasn’t the only marsh area along the eastern shore of Great Salt Lake where he saw swans. He spotted decent numbers of birds as far south as private duck clubs in Davis and Salt Lake counties.

“Sago pondweed is the main plant swans eat while they’re in Utah,” says Stringham, migratory game bird coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources. “Both the Bear River Refuge and the Willard Spur south of the refuge were dry earlier this year, and neither area produced the amount of pondweed it usually does. I think the swans are on the move, looking for pondweed.”

The DWR usually flies its weekly swan surveys on Tuesday mornings. You can see where the swans are by visiting the DWR’s website at http://go.usa.gov/Xop.

More than 14,600 swans

During the Oct. 30 flight, Stringham counted 14,690 swans. He says that number could double—to as many as 40,000 swans—in just a week or two.

“If you drew a swan hunting permit for this fall,” he says, “now is a great time to grab your gun and head to the marsh.”
Stringham reminds you that the Bear River Refuge is a federal refuge, and it has some rules that are different from rules at marshes managed by the state. You can learn more on pages 20 and 21 of the 2012 – 2013 Utah Waterfowl Guidebook.

The free guidebook is available at www.wildlife.utah.gov/guidebooks.

Utah’s swan hunting season ends Dec. 9. A total of 2,000 hunters drew a swan hunting permit earlier this fall. The 2,000 hunters are the only hunters who can hunt swans.

Hunting tips

If you’re one of the hunters who drew a permit, Stringham says you should spend time watching the swans and learning their flight patterns. Tundra swans are very consistent in the times of day they fly and the routes they take. However, three factors—hunting pressure, changes in the weather and the availability of food—can change a swan’s flight pattern.

Ice-up is another thing to watch for. As the water starts to freeze, swans will be in the air more, searching for areas that still have open water.

To protect trumpeter swans, Stringham reminds you that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Utah Wildlife Board have closed all of the areas in Utah north of the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, and north of Forest Street (the road leading from Brigham City to the refuge), to swan hunting.

Swan hunting reminders

If you drew a swan permit, please remember the following. These requirements help the DWR and the USFWS obtain an accurate count of the number of trumpeter swans that hunters accidentally take:

  • Within 72 hours of taking a swan, you must take your bird to a DWR office, or the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, so it can be examined and measured.
  • You must complete a harvest questionnaire no later than Jan. 8, 2013. The questionnaire must be completed, even if you don’t hunt swans or take a swan.

You can access the questionnaire online at www.wildlife.utah.gov. It can also be completed by calling 1-800-221-0659.

If you don’t do these things, you’ll have to meet several additional requirements—including paying a $50 late fee and completing the swan orientation course again—before you can apply for a swan permit in 2013.

Read and join the discussion on Swans Migrate into Utah Marshes at OutdoorHub.com.

Minnesota DNR Announces Live Bald Eagle Event

October 19, 2012

Minnesota DNR Announces Live Bald Eagle Event

A live bald eagle from The Raptor Center of Minnesota will be on display Oct. 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Cabela’s in Rogers, Minn., according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

Representatives from the DNR’s Nongame Wildlife Program and The Raptor Center will also be available to answer questions about bald eagles and eagle conservation in Minnesota.

The DNR, The Raptor Center and Cabela’s have teamed up to promote a variety of new copper rifle and shotgun ammunition for deer hunting. This is the first eagle-safe event to promote copper ammunition for deer hunting by a major outdoor retailer in the nation.

“This ammo has proven to be ballistically superior to lead bullets,” said Carrol Henderson, supervisor, DNR Nongame Wildlife Program. “It is more accurate, penetrates better and has more knock-down ability than comparable lead bullets. This is great news for deer hunters, and copper bullets are also not toxic to bald eagles, which routinely scavenge on deer gut-piles.”

According to Henderson, the cost of copper ammo is higher than for lead bullets, but hunters have learned that they might only use five or six copper bullets per season if they sight in their guns with lead bullets then use the copper ones for the deer hunt. This way, a box of 20 copper bullets may last three to four years.

Attendees will also have opportunity to have their picture taken with a mounted bald eagle that will be on display.

Read and join the discussion on Minnesota DNR Announces Live Bald Eagle Event at OutdoorHub.com.

Product Feature: Sony DEV-5 Digital Binocular with HD Video Recording

September 25, 2012

Product Feature: Sony Digital Binocular with HD Video Recording

Think of it as a trail camera that lets you observe wildlife in real-time. Earlier this year, Sony launched the first product of its kind in the United States, the DEV-5, a digital binocular that records HD video with incredible magnification capability. It allows the user to observe wildlife from great distances, making the user essentially imperceptible to the animal in view.

From the DEV-5  press release,

Ideal for watching and capturing wildlife and sporting action in steady, sharply-focused close-up, Sony’s new binoculars has a 3D record mode that captures the scene as a thrilling stereoscopic video footage. Variable zoom allows users to scan a wide area at low magnification before zooming in seamlessly to pinpoint the distant subject.

By turning on digital zoom at magnification settings over 10x, the DEV-5 boosts total magnification range from 0.9x up to 20x, rivaling many high-powered conventional binoculars. Unlike traditional binoculars, electronic autofocus keeps the subject sharply resolved at all times and even in motion.

An optical stabilization system keeps images clear and stable, even when looking at objects far in the distance. The camera binocular can be connected to a television for big-screen viewing and it is powered by a high-capacity rechargeable battery pack (NP-FV70) that will last for three hours on a single charge.

The DEV-5, which offers digital zoom extension up to 20x and includes a GPS receiver to auto-geotag video clips, is currently priced at $1,999.99. While its GPS-less, 10x zoom counterpart, the DEV-3, is going for $1,400.

View the video from Sony below to find out more about this new wave of products on the shelf today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjP_QJDneDA

Read Product Feature: Sony DEV-5 Digital Binocular with HD Video Recording in its entirety on OutdoorHub.com.

New Hampshire’s Free National Hunting and Fishing Day Events – Sept. 22

September 20, 2012

New Hampshire’s Free National Hunting and Fishing Day Events – Sept. 22

Get set for the hunting and fishing seasons ahead this Saturday, September 22, as the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department celebrates National Hunting and Fishing Day in a big way with exciting free events in Concord and Holderness.

A giant Sporting Expo will take over the grounds of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, 11 Hazen Drive in Concord from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free! The Expo features more than 70 exhibits with the latest hunting and fishing-related products and services, plus a chance to try hands-on activities like archery, crossbow, air rifle, and that new four-wheeler you’ve been dreaming about. See pointing dog demos (at 10:15 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1:15 p.m.) and retriever dog demos (at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 p.m., 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m.).

Throughout the day at the Expo, New Hampshire Falconers will have live birds of prey on view, and entertainer Jim Barnes will add to the fun with his foot-stompin’ music. Radio station 96.5 The Mill will broadcast live from the event. Be sure to get in on the huge raffle, with more than 50 items including a pheasant hunt for two and a Savage Arms Axis rifle, to benefit the Wildlife Heritage Foundation of New Hampshire (drawing at 2 p.m.). Support for the event also provided by John Deere and Bonneville & Son Jeep. Food concession available.

Also on Saturday, September 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., come enjoy a free Open House at Owl Brook Hunter Education Center at 387 Perch Pond Road in Holderness. The event features hands-on activities related to the shooting sports, hunting and trapping, plus seminars on tree stand safety and trapping, a free sporting goods raffle and ice cream from the Granite State Dairy Promotion.

Learn more about National Hunting and Fishing Day, and see lists of exhibitors and raffle prizes at http://www.wildnh.com/nhfday.

Read New Hampshire’s Free National Hunting and Fishing Day Events – Sept. 22 in its entirety on OutdoorHub.com.

New Hampshire’s Free National Hunting and Fishing Day Events – Sept. 22

September 20, 2012

New Hampshire’s Free National Hunting and Fishing Day Events – Sept. 22

Get set for the hunting and fishing seasons ahead this Saturday, September 22, as the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department celebrates National Hunting and Fishing Day in a big way with exciting free events in Concord and Holderness.

A giant Sporting Expo will take over the grounds of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, 11 Hazen Drive in Concord from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free! The Expo features more than 70 exhibits with the latest hunting and fishing-related products and services, plus a chance to try hands-on activities like archery, crossbow, air rifle, and that new four-wheeler you’ve been dreaming about. See pointing dog demos (at 10:15 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1:15 p.m.) and retriever dog demos (at 10:30 a.m., 11:30 p.m., 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m.).

Throughout the day at the Expo, New Hampshire Falconers will have live birds of prey on view, and entertainer Jim Barnes will add to the fun with his foot-stompin’ music. Radio station 96.5 The Mill will broadcast live from the event. Be sure to get in on the huge raffle, with more than 50 items including a pheasant hunt for two and a Savage Arms Axis rifle, to benefit the Wildlife Heritage Foundation of New Hampshire (drawing at 2 p.m.). Support for the event also provided by John Deere and Bonneville & Son Jeep. Food concession available.

Also on Saturday, September 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., come enjoy a free Open House at Owl Brook Hunter Education Center at 387 Perch Pond Road in Holderness. The event features hands-on activities related to the shooting sports, hunting and trapping, plus seminars on tree stand safety and trapping, a free sporting goods raffle and ice cream from the Granite State Dairy Promotion.

Learn more about National Hunting and Fishing Day, and see lists of exhibitors and raffle prizes at http://www.wildnh.com/nhfday.

Read New Hampshire’s Free National Hunting and Fishing Day Events – Sept. 22 in its entirety on OutdoorHub.com.

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