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California Pheasant Hunting on Mondays During the 2012 Season

October 31, 2012

California Pheasant Hunting on Mondays During the 2012 Season

The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) will offer several Monday pheasant hunting opportunities at northern California Type A wildlife areas in 2012.

The pheasant season opens on the second Saturday of November (Nov. 10) and the length of the season will remain the same: 44 consecutive days for the general season and 60 consecutive days for the archery season. For the 2012 hunting season, wildlife areas are open for pheasant hunting as follows:

Type A wildlife areas in the Sacramento Valley (Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, Delevan National Wildlife Refuge, Colusa National Wildlife Refuge, Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area and Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area) will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays, and only the first Monday (Nov. 12) of the pheasant season.  Grizzly Island Wildlife Area will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays, and only the second Monday (Nov. 19) of the pheasant season.

Type A wildlife areas in the San Joaquin Valley (Los Banos Wildlife Area, Mendota Wildlife Area, North Grasslands Wildlife Area and San Luis National Wildlife Refuge) will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays only during the pheasant season.  Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge will be open for pheasant hunting on the first Monday of the pheasant season (Nov. 12).

The Wister Unit of Imperial Wildlife Area in Imperial County and San Jacinto Wildlife Area in Riverside County will be closed to pheasant hunting this year.

Type C wildlife areas will remain open as normal.

DFG reduced the number of days that certain wildlife areas were open for pheasant hunting in recent years due to a decline the number of hunters targeting pheasant and the cost to operate check stations during the first week of the season.  Some of those reductions will remain in place for 2012, but pheasant hunting will be offered in some locations on the first or second Monday of the season.

The modifications of the shoot days on Type A wildlife areas are pursuant to subsections 550(b)(1) and 550(b)(2) of Title 14, California Code of Regulations.

Reports and publications on pheasant harvest can be found here. A list of wildlife areas can be found in the current Waterfowl and Upland Game Hunting Regulations booklet (www.dfg.ca.gov/regulations/).

For more information on specific hunting opportunities, hunters should contact their regional DFG office.

Read and join the discussion on California Pheasant Hunting on Mondays During the 2012 Season at OutdoorHub.com.

Commission Big Game Permits Raise Money for Conservation in Kansas

October 31, 2012

Commission Big Game Permits Raise Money for Conservation in Kansas

The Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism commission will draw the names of seven lucky wildlife conservation organization chapters at its January public meeting. Those chapters will receive a big game permit voucher, which they can sell to the highest bidder to raise money for their conservation efforts. Applications are being accepted now.

Any Kansas-based nonprofit organization that actively promotes wildlife conservation and the hunting and fishing heritage is eligible to apply. Only one permit per organization will be awarded; however, individual chapters of the same organization may receive permits. A chapter or organization is eligible to receive only one Commission Big Game permit in a three-year period.

Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism commissioners will conduct the drawing on January 10, 2013 at Butler County Community College in El Dorado. Applications must be received no later than Jan. 1, 2013.

To apply, organizations must submit an application that includes a copy of their 501(c)(3) nonprofit status, articles of incorporation, and mission statement, as well as the organization’s preference for an elk, antelope or deer permit. Applications can be downloaded from KDWPT’s website,www.ksoutdoors.com; enter “2013 Commission Big Game Permit” in the search box. Mail applications to Sheila Kemmis, Commission Secretary, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, 512 SE 25th Ave., Pratt, KS 67124.

Seven permits will be issued, which may include one elk, one antelope and up to seven deer, depending upon the preferences of the drawn organizations. Organizations that draw a permit must pay KDWPT the permit fee, and they will be issued a voucher. The final recipient of the voucher then remits the voucher to KDWPT’s licensing section for the actual big game permit. Permits may be issued to resident or nonresident hunters and are valid in management units and seasons listed on the permits.

Once an organization sells a permit, not less than 85 percent of the amount is returned to KDWPT to be spent on mutually agreed-upon projects. The remaining 15 percent can be spent at the organization’s discretion. (If Kansas Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry (KFHFH) receives a permit, not less than 15 percent of the funds raised is remitted to KDWPT with 85 percent staying with KFHFH.)

Read and join the discussion on Commission Big Game Permits Raise Money for Conservation in Kansas at OutdoorHub.com.

Youth Pheasant and Quail Season Nov. 3-4 in Kansas

October 31, 2012

Youth Pheasant and Quail Season Nov. 3-4 in Kansas

Those of us who’ve hunted pheasants and quail for years have the second Saturday in November indelibly marked on our mind’s calendar. That’s the traditional opening day of Kansas’ pheasant and quail seasons, and rain or shine, good bird populations or not, we’ll honor our bird hunting heritage and get out in the fields on opening day. However, the weekend before opening day is perhaps even more important to our youth and our hunting traditions.

November 3-4 are reserved for youth 16 and younger to hunt pheasants and quail under adult supervision. The youth season was established as part of the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism’s Pass It On program, which is designed to recruit and retain hunters. The youth season provides young hunters and their mentors the opportunity to be in the field before the crowds of opening day. Adults may not hunt. Public lands and Walk-In Hunting Access lands are open, and hunting pressure is usually light. Adult mentors can pass on their hunting knowledge to youth without giving up their own opening day traditions.

Resident youth 15 and younger do not need anything other than an adult supervisor to hunt during the youth season. Hunter education certification is recommended but not necessary as long as the youth hunts under adult supervision. Sixteen-year-old hunters need a hunting license and hunter education is required to purchase a hunting license, unless they opt for the apprentice license. Anyone 16 or older who has not completed an approved hunter education course may purchase an apprentice license, which is a one-time deferral of the hunter education requirement. Adult supervision is required at all times for an apprentice license holder, even during the regular season.

Daily bag limits during the youth pheasant and quail season are half those of the regular season; 2 rooster pheasants and 4 quail.

An annual resident hunting license is $20.50. However, resident youth age 16-21 qualify for a multi-year hunting license, which is valid through the year they turn 21. It’s a bargain at $42.50 for the hunting license and $72.50 for the combination hunting/fishing license.

Read and join the discussion on Youth Pheasant and Quail Season Nov. 3-4 in Kansas at OutdoorHub.com.

Limbsaver Recognized with 16th Gold Best Buy Award

October 31, 2012

Limbsaver Recognized with 16th Gold Best Buy Award

The much anticipated Annual Best Buy awards was unveiled in the October/November 2012 issue of Inside Archery. Limbsaver is honored to have earned gold for two of their products this year; Limbsaver’s S-Coil Stabilizer and the Limbsaver UltraMax Silencer.

“This is the 11th consecutive year that our Limbsaver products have won gold, silver or bronze Best Buy Awards,” stated Alan Lotton, Limbsaver Marketing VP. “While we are not surprised that our products perform so well over our competitors, we are grateful for the recognition we receive every year from our loyal dealers and Inside Archery.”

Since 2002, Limbsaver products have been awarded 30 Inside Archery Best Buy Awards; 16 Gold, 12 Silver, and 2 Bronze. Limbsaver is honored by the support they receive from their dealers and the subscribers who continue to vote for them year after year.

As innovators of an expansive line of quality archery accessories, Limbsaver continues their commitment to deliver exceptional performance to outdoorsmen, target enthusiasts and athletes worldwide.

For more information on the complete line of Limbsaver products, please visit www.limbsaver.com.

Read and join the discussion on Limbsaver Recognized with 16th Gold Best Buy Award at OutdoorHub.com.

Nature and the Pursuit of Life: Fall is the Season for Deep Change

October 31, 2012

Nature and the Pursuit of Life: Fall is the Season for Deep Change

The woods were open, with leaves covering the forest floor. I sat atop my favorite ridge perched in a tree, gazing over a stunning view with my bow hanging next to me. When the woods are open, it feels as if you can see for miles. The morning was active with deer, but not the buck I was hunting for so I sit in solitude and stare out into the area around me and up into the sky far beyond this perfect place. Thoughts come out of me: “Farbz, your life has truly followed the rhythm of the fall this year. The woods transform as the fall progresses, as I have as well this year.” I pull out my iPhone, open up the notes app and I begin to type away the thoughts that come streaming into my mind. The following came out this past Friday and Saturday from my tree stand, I hope it resonates and that you receive an actionable takeaway from it.

Simplification of life is an amazing goal to constantly strive for. What if we could change our lives, remove our destructive patterns, and enhance our flow to jive with the leaves of fall? It is amazing how leaves work their cycle from green to colors, through their peak, and then they shed and fall to the ground and open up the woods again until spring. The fall of 2012 is proving to be a season of self-awareness and deep personal growth for me, where I seem to be in rhythm with the leaves. Having turned 40 last October, I vowed that this year’s fall would represent great change and it has indeed. In fact, I am changing so much like the leaves this year that it is almost uncanny.

This summer I reached one of those badly needed “clear it out” phases, where I knew I was capable of more in my life but I needed to “clear it out”. I decided to set the stage by removing alcohol from my life late this summer. Being an internet ad man in the outdoor industry these past six years has upped my necessity to entertain and with it built up a social drinking habit which had begun numbing out too much of my life. I have nothing against drinking, let me be clear, and I love a great beer or glass of wine, but I l allowed it to take too much of me. Too many days I would meet a client for a drink before coming home. Too many days I felt half-present with my wife and kids. Too many days I dozed off in my oldest son Hunter’s bed while reading him a book. Enough with becoming ornery or impatient with River or Fischer, my other sons, enough with not living with consciousness in my life. Yes, it was time to shed the habit, enough is enough. As the leaves began to transform so had I as a father, a hunter, and a man.

Upon quitting drinking, the love, the energy, the connection that I instantly felt while consciously looking into the eyes of my family created an intense burst of colors that I best compare to the October peak. The initial days were bright and each day seemed clearer and brighter. However, along with this brightness comes some dark sobering realities in life and in business, kind of like what a cold storm with high winds does to damage the peak colors as they begin to fade. The woods still have their colorful beauty with some transparency, which opens up more to be seen. With brightness still there, things become a little clearer, yet a little darker.

Once sober and clear, you begin to look deeper into the person that you are without the numbness, without the distraction, without the alibi, and you won’t like everything you see. This fall I have learned many valuable life lessons and not all were good, but lessons nonetheless and in the end I believe there is good in all lessons that help us grow. When the forest is covered with foliage, much of its contents can hide in the canopy. The thick green cover provides the ability to not be seen, however when the camouflage of the leaves around us sheds away, we are left naked and exposed. While there are gifts in this bare state, all of our flaws, weaknesses, and insecurities come to light. Within this place we can find clarity. Nobody said seeing clearly is easy, however it removes much of the unknown or at least many of the fears. Remember the saying that FEAR stands for FICTITIOUS EVENTS APPEARING REAL. Once the leaves have fallen and we can see clearly, the EVENTS become clearer and more real.

Looking at my life and at my character with the leaves gone, I had allowed myself to become over-committed with too many distractions. In turn this has tainted my ability to laser-focus in the way that I often preach to others as being critical. It became time to start shedding distractions. So as the leaves fall, so do many of my distractions, one at a time I am removing the clutter and “clearing it out”, you can do the same. Whether it is bad deals, toxic relationships, low return wasted time in personal distractions, old clothes that have sat around and should be donated or given to a friend, crap scattered around the office, you name it–it is time to “clear it out”. Yes, I believe fall represents the phase in which we should simplify life by allowing many of our leaves to fall off. Let us make room for that which is new, that which is important, and that which makes us better as human beings with a stronger, more connected purpose.

There are days where we will feel like the hunter and there will be days when we feel like the hunted. Today on this ridge I am perhaps somewhere in-between, and there are no leaves that remain to hide me from exposure, so every muscle in my body must remain still–except my active fingers typing away. Thoughts fly in and out of my head, but I am present and I am in the hunt. Perhaps what makes this time of year so special is the ability to sit and reflect in solitude like no other time, while remaining in the moment. On one hand I think many people struggle with sitting for hours on end in a tree because they fear boredom, or perhaps they fear the self-reflection, or perhaps they fear slowing down and being present, however for me the hunt is a way of life.

Within the life of the true hunter, there will be highs and there will be lows. However the clarity, the purpose, the focus, and the presence make up much of what I love in life. I have to go now, as a buck is pushing a doe below the ridge from me. Sorry, but the hunt is on…

Read and join the discussion on Nature and the Pursuit of Life: Fall is the Season for Deep Change at OutdoorHub.com.

Maine’s Wildlife Expected to be Fine After Hurricane Sandy

October 31, 2012

Maine’s Wildlife Expected to be Fine After Hurricane Sandy

The majority of Mainers were able to weather the effects of Hurricane Sandy and avoid serious storm damage, and the same is expected to hold true for the state’s wildlife species.

While wildlife species didn’t have the advantage of staying updated on the storm’s progress from media outlets and public officials, many species are innately able to adapt to harsh weather and know to find shelter when it approaches.

The storm brought strong winds and rain to Maine, but isn’t thought to have caused enough damage to have any significant effects on wildlife such as moose, deer, bear, birds or fish.

“If we had experienced heavy flooding that lasted a few days, it may have been an issue, but moose and deer are typically able to handle storms like this without a problem,” Biologist Lee Kantar said. “From what I have seen, they should be just fine.”

Bears will usually wait out storms in the relative safety of tree tops, especially when high winds make it difficult for them to sense danger.

During this time of year, most bears across the state are already in dens. Even if their den was flooded, bears would have time now to relocate to a dryer and safer den before deep snow falls.

The storm’s extremely low pressure system would have alerted birds to the impending weather, causing them to find a safe shelter to hunker down in.

The weather pattern would have also stopped southward migration that is on-going or caused migrating birds to fly around it.

The Department’s bird biologists do plan to monitor beaches hit by the storm to determine if any significant beach habitat erosion occurred, especially in areas where piping plovers typically set up nests.

Luckily, the plovers have already migrated South for the winter to warmer locations such as South Carolina, Florida, the Gulf of Mexico and should be able to adapt to any changes in Maine’s beaches when they return to nest.

When it comes to fish species, they are well suited to deal with periodic episodes of high water and it is unlikely that we will see any long-term impacts for fish from the storm.

Read and join the discussion on Maine’s Wildlife Expected to be Fine After Hurricane Sandy at OutdoorHub.com.

Michigan DNR Encourages Support for Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger

October 31, 2012

Michigan DNR Encourages Support for Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger

With more than 1.1 million Michigan residents annually seeking food assistance, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) encourages hunters to keep this critical need in mind as they head out this season.

The DNR asks all hunters to consider making a donation to Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger (MSAH) when purchasing hunting licenses this year. Donations will be used to support the processing of deer donated to participating processors. Last year, the venison donated to local food banks and food kitchens throughout Michigan supplied enough meat to provide more than 100,000 meals with a source of nutritious protein.

“Today, we have the opportunity to continue a tradition started by hunters before us, who hunted to provide food for early settlements in Michigan,” said Raymond Rustem, DNR liaison for MSAH. “Hunter donations of funds or venison can help those who are still experiencing hard times in our state.”

When renewing fishing or hunting licenses, residents should tell the license vendor of their intent to make a monetary donation to the Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger program. Anglers and hunters can donate in amounts of $1, $5, $10 or $20. The vendor will simply add the donation amount to the overall purchase price and it will show up as an additional item on the license.

Those who would like to donate a deer should visit the MSAH website, www.sportsmenagainsthunger.org, to find the nearest processor.

Rustem pointed out that even individuals who don’t fish or hunt can still support this important program by visiting the Michigan e-Store at www.michigan.gov/estore, click on Tax-Deductible Donations, and then choose the Help Feed the Hungry option. Fill in the information about the donation and add the item to the cart.

“Many people continue to struggle in this economy,” he added. “Donating to this important effort is a simple way to help.”

Rustem reminded donors to save any receipts or forms. Donations to Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger are tax-deductible.

Since 1991, Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger has been working to create linkages between donors, wild game processors and charities that feed needy individuals. MSAH is an all-volunteer organization and is led by sportsmen and women concerned about making a positive difference in the community. Together, they have assembled a network of processors and charities across Michigan to help channel wild game donations into the hands of those in need. Learn more at www.sportsmenagainsthunger.org.

Read and join the discussion on Michigan DNR Encourages Support for Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger at OutdoorHub.com.

Indiana’s Bonus Deer Licenses Not Allowed on Some Public Sites

October 31, 2012

Indiana’s Bonus Deer Licenses Not Allowed on Some Public Sites

Hunters will not be able to use bonus antlerless deer licenses this year on some DNR-managed properties in northern Indiana because the extra hunting pressure is not needed to control the population at those sites.

The sites are Menominee Wetland Conservation Area (near Plymouth), Maxinkuckee Wetland Conservation Area (near Culver), the Hufford Wildlife Trust Area (south of Monticello), and the Manitou Wetland Conservation Area, including the Judy Burton Nature Preserve and the Bob Kern Nature Preserve (near Rochester).

The new special antlerless firearms season (Dec. 26, 2012 – Jan. 6, 2013) will be closed on the above listed properties as well.

Bonus antlerless deer licenses and the special antlerless firearm season help manage deer numbers by harvesting extra antlerless deer in areas where deer are too numerous and may be causing damage. Hunting pressure typically is high enough on public hunting areas during the archery, firearms, and muzzleloader seasons to adequately control the deer population without the need to harvest additional antlerless deer.

Hunters may still harvest antlerless deer at these properties with archery, crossbow, or muzzleloader licenses within the respective season dates, equipment requirements, and bag limits. During the deer firearms season (Nov. 17 – Dec. 2), hunters must only harvest antlered deer from these properties.

Read and join the discussion on Indiana’s Bonus Deer Licenses Not Allowed on Some Public Sites at OutdoorHub.com.

This Week on Outdoors Radio: Wisconsin Gun Deer Hunt Forecast

October 31, 2012

JW Sims, of Cottage Grove, Wisconsin, with a nice buck he arrowed last season. Wiscnsin hunters can look forward to another good season this year. photo courtesy of JW Sims

This week, Dan Small Outdoors Radio features Wisconsin big-game ecologist Kevin Wallenfang, emerald ash borer specialist Mick Skwarok, Wildlife Research Center communications director Ron Bice, Milford Hills Hunt Club general manager Michael Quello, Outdoors Radio newsletter editor Les Booth and Madison tackle dealer Gene Dellinger. Jeff passes on a nice buck. Dan fishes for salmon on the Sheboygan River.

Exclusive to podcast and FM 100.5 ESPN broadcast: Gene Dellinger, proprietor of D&S Bait, Tackle & Archery in Madison, reports fishing has improved on the Madison Chain now that the lakes have turned over. (www.dsbait.com)

DNR big-game ecologist Kevin Wallenfang offers a forecast for Wisconsin’s gun deer season. (www.dnr.wi.gov).

Mick Skwarok, communications specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, provides an update on the emerald ash borer infestation in Wisconsin. (www.banthebeetle.wi.gov)

Ron Bice, director of communications for Wildlife Research Center, says gun deer hunters should control their human scent just as bow hunters do and offers advice on how to do it. (www.wildlife.com).

Michael Quello, general manger of Milford Hills Hunt Club, urges deer hunters to get their guns cleaned and sighted in now to avoid the last-minute rush. (www.milfordhills.com).

Outdoors Radio Newsletter Editor Les Booth reports on his salmon fishing outing with outdoor writer Jay Campbell and his wife, Karen. (www.ofieldstream.com).

This week’s giveaway – A Supercharged Scent Killer Combo Pack from Wildlife Research, includes 32- and 12-oz. bottles of Scent Killer, a copy of the book Scent Free Secrets, a bottle of Trail’s End 307, a 4-pack of key wicks and a Scent Secrets DVD. Retail value over $50. Call 414-297-7554 and leave your name, phone number and mention the Scent Killer giveaway, or email us at outdoorsradio@gmx.com.

Outdoors Radio airs each weekend on 12 stations throughout Wisconsin. See a list of stations, listen to the current show or an archived show or subscribe to the weekly e-newsletter or podcast at http://www.lake-link.com/radio. Outdoors Radio is also streamed twice daily at 11 p.m. and 5 p.m. PDT at http://www.theradiofactory.com. Read the Outdoors Radio e-newsletter each week at http://www.dansmalloutdoors.com.

Read and join the discussion on This Week on Outdoors Radio: Wisconsin Gun Deer Hunt Forecast at OutdoorHub.com.

California Pheasant Hunting on Mondays during the 2012 Season

October 31, 2012

California Pheasant Hunting on Mondays during the 2012 Season

The California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) will offer several Monday pheasant hunting opportunities at northern California Type A wildlife areas in 2012.

The pheasant season opens on the second Saturday of November (Nov. 10) and the length of the season will remain the same: 44 consecutive days for the general season and 60 consecutive days for the archery season. For the 2012 hunting season, wildlife areas are open for pheasant hunting as follows:

Type A wildlife areas in the Sacramento Valley (Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, Delevan National Wildlife Refuge, Colusa National Wildlife Refuge, Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area and Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area) will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays, and only the first Monday (Nov. 12) of the pheasant season. Grizzly Island Wildlife Area will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays, and only the second Monday (Nov. 19) of the pheasant season.

Type A wildlife areas in the San Joaquin Valley (Los Banos Wildlife Area, Mendota Wildlife Area, North Grasslands Wildlife Area and San Luis National Wildlife Refuge) will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays only during the pheasant season. Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge will be open for pheasant hunting on the first Monday of the pheasant season (Nov. 12).

The Wister Unit of Imperial Wildlife Area in Imperial County and San Jacinto Wildlife Area in Riverside County will be closed to pheasant hunting this year.

Type C wildlife areas will remain open as normal.

DFG reduced the number of days that certain wildlife areas were open for pheasant hunting in recent years due to a decline the number of hunters targeting pheasant and the cost to operate check stations during the first week of the season. Some of those reductions will remain in place for 2012, but pheasant hunting will be offered in some locations on the first or second Monday of the season.

The modifications of the shoot days on Type A wildlife areas are pursuant to subsections 550(b)(1) and 550(b)(2) of Title 14, California Code of Regulations.

Reports and publications on pheasant harvest can be found at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/uplandgame. A list of wildlife areas can be found in the current Waterfowl and Upland Game Hunting Regulations booklet (www.dfg.ca.gov/regulations/).

For more information on specific hunting opportunities, hunters should contact their regional DFG office.

Read and join the discussion on California Pheasant Hunting on Mondays during the 2012 Season at OutdoorHub.com.

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