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Introducing the Zombie Apocalypse Knife from Browning

July 31, 2012

Introducing the Zombie Apocalypse Knife from Browning

When the ammunition has run out, be prepared for up close fighting during the zombie outbreak with the new Browning Zombie Apocalypse Knife. This well balanced razor sharp knife should be included with your zombie outbreak survival gear should this outbreak ever occur.

For cutting, slashing and hacking, the Browning Zombie Apocalypse Knife features a razor sharp 7″ drop point blade. It also features a full tang construction and ultra secure grip for optimum balance and control. The Zombie Apocalypse Knife comes with a durable nylon sheath with belt loop for quick access when the knife is needed.

Make sure you stay protected during the zombie outbreak with the Browning Zombie Apocalypse Knife.

Suggested retail price: $61.95

Please visit www.browning.com for more information about Browning products. 

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Hunter Safety Course Offered in Florida’s Santa Rosa County

July 31, 2012

Hunter Safety Course Offered in Florida’s Santa Rosa County

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Santa Rosa County.

The course will be at Avalon Middle School, 5445 King Arthur’s Way, Milton. Instruction is from 6-10 p.m. Aug. 14, 16, 21 and 23 and 7-10 a.m. Aug. 25.

Students who have taken the Internet course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report and attend only the Aug. 14 session from 6-10 p.m. and Aug. 25 from 7-10 a.m.

An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes.

The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces.

People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWC’s regional office in Panama City at 850-265-3676.

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Free Hunter Safety Internet-completion Course in Florida’s Holmes County

July 31, 2012

Free Hunter Safety Internet-completion Course in Florida’s Holmes County

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Holmes County.

The course will be at the First Baptist Church, 311 N. Waukesha St. in Bonifay. Instruction is from 6-9 p.m. Aug. 17 and 8 a.m. to noon Aug. 18.

Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the final report from the online portion of the course. The final report form does not have to be notarized.

An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes.

The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces.

People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWC’s regional office in Panama City at 850-265-3676.

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Using Your Property’s Terrain to Hunt Big Bucks

July 31, 2012

Using Your Property’s Terrain to Hunt Big Bucks

As we continue to unravel the mystical world of whitetail, we learn more about whitetail travel routes and how the general characteristics of a property parlay in their seasonal routines.

Funnels are whitetail hot spots, especially during the rut. They are simply terrain features or manmade objects that condense a whitetail’s travel route. Here are five tips on where to look for them and how they work from many of the outdoors’ best and brightest.

1. Finger: Finding a finger of woods that jogs into a field is an ideal spot to find a big buck cruising. These are found easily by studying aerial maps. Considering that deer tend to stay concealed, they’ll be able to scent check the field without ever taking a step out of the woods. These key spots are found everywhere, however, Illinois, Missouri, and Iowa are known for them specifically.

2. Swamp: If you’ve ever hunted a swamp, you may know what I mean when I say it’s difficult and it can be tricky! Deer would prefer to stay dry and walk along the higher regions of marshy or swampy areas. Try to spot cattails or bogs and then look on the outskirts of those regions. You may find a dry trail that deer will use most of the time compared to trudging through the nasty stuff. I’ve seen deer splash through some knee-high algae-infested waters, but when it boils down to it – deer are going to stay on the high side more times than not.

3. Fence: You’ve probably heard about this strategy before a time or two, but it’s one of my favorite setups. Take a walk along a fence line and if you find a spot where it’s busted or low, you’ve found yourself a fence funnel. Deer travel most according to their ease of access. When they don’t have to do the limbo or high jump, they’d rather breeze through a fence that’s low without any acrobatic moves needed. You can setup on either side of the fence according to wind direction.

4. Saddle: I primarily hunt the bluff regions of western Wisconsin. This offers some immaculate hunting and it’s beneficial for anyone who really wants to tag a monster trolling for doe. Saddles are perfect locations for deer to cross, without having to walk the incline of a steep hillside. When a buck’s got a doe on his mind, the only thing he’s really thinking is how fast can he get from point-A-to-point-B. The more miles put on, the more likely he’s able to find a hot doe. This valley feature is an ideal way for bucks to save energy and make an easy pass across the low side of a bluff.

5. Water: Creeks and streams are beautiful geological evidence that deer certainly do cross from one side to the other by using the lowest or driest part of the streambed. Yes, we all know that deer swim, however, 9 times out of 10 they prefer crossing a creek or stream coming out soggy. If you find a trail that cuts through a bank – you’ve struck gold. When it comes to staying dry, especially in the colder months of November and December, deer will slosh through knee-high water rather than swim.

Sometimes we as hunters have the ability to over think hunting, but that’s what makes it so much fun. It’s a thinking game that involves strategy and technique. Although the strategies we put to work can be extremely technological, we need to stop and ask ourselves, “If I were a deer, what would I do?” You’ll be amazed by the answers you find and the secrets unveiled.

I urge every hunter to check out www.MappingTheOutdoors.com. They offer hunters incredible aerial maps in all sizes that will help you pinpoint areas with a higher probability of deer activity, such as saddles, funnels, and converging hubs. Use a map like this to familiarize yourself with both the area and the terrain you’re hunting. The website will also help you identify hunting stands, as well as other pertinent information such as property boundaries, streams and creeks, ponds, food plots, trails, and structures!

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Waterfowl Hunters and Harvest Increase from 2010 in Minnesota

July 31, 2012

Waterfowl Hunters and Harvest Increase from 2010 in Minnesota

Minnesota hunters bagged more ducks and Canada geese in 2011 than in 2010 and more waterfowl hunters took to the field, too, reversing a downward trend, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

“The results are in and the numbers moved in a good direction,” said Dennis Simon, DNR wildlife section chief. “Duck hunter numbers and success were up, resulting in an increased harvest from 2010.”

Simon said new data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also showed that Minnesota ranked first in the nation in Canada goose harvest and second in the number of active waterfowl hunters.

“The takeaway from last year’s season is that more waterfowl hunters were in the field and those who went hunting had better success, which is a good thing and something hunters have longed for,” said Simon. “It means that the harvest was up as well, but total duck harvest was still well within our long-term historic averages.”

The total duck harvest in Minnesota increased 19 percent from 2010, from 524,000 ducks in 2010 to 621,000 ducks in 2011. The recent 10-year average harvest is 655,000 ducks.

Mallards were the most common duck in hunters’ bags, with 181,000 mallards harvested. Mallards represented 29 percent of the total duck bag. The recent 10-year average mallard harvest is 206,000 mallards.

Wood ducks were the second most common duck in hunters’ bags, with 151,000 wood ducks harvested in 2011 compared to 78,000 in 2010. The recent 10-year average wood duck harvest is 102,000 birds. Blue-winged teal harvest was 90,000, ring-necked duck harvest was 63,000, and green-winged teal harvest was 37,000.

Duck hunter success was 8.1 ducks per hunter per season, which increased from 7.5 ducks per hunter per season in 2010 and near the 10-year average of 8.4 ducks per hunter per season.

Steve Cordts, DNR waterfowl specialist, said the agency made a number of regulation changes in 2011 that collectively played a role in last year’s higher harvest. “We created additional opportunity by establishing North and South Duck zones and opening the season one week earlier than normal. Hen mallard and wood duck bag limits were changed. Shooting hours were changed to one-half hour before sunrise on opening day,” said Cordts. “Breeding duck numbers and duck production were also very good in 2010, which resulted in large numbers of ducks present during fall hunting seasons.”

Cordts said opening the season earlier likely had the most impact on increases to duck harvest, particularly with the large increase in harvest for early migrant species like blue-winged teal and wood ducks.

Canada goose harvest increased from 189,000 in 2010 to 239,000 in 2010 and was above the 10-year average of 220,000 Canada geese. About 100,000 Canada geese were harvested during the early September goose season.

The number of active duck hunters in Minnesota was 77,000 in 2011, an increase from 70,000 in 2010. Minnesota ranked second nationally in 2011 in numbers of active duck hunters, trailing only Louisiana. “While encouraging, this is still lower than the 100,000 active duck hunters in Minnesota as recently as 1999,” said Cordts.

Estimates of hunting activity and harvest are derived using the Harvest Information Program (HIP), required for all migratory bird hunters. A series of screening questions are asked of hunters when they purchase a license. The screening questions are not the harvest survey but help to better identify migratory bird hunters, who are then randomly selected and mailed harvest surveys and asked to record hunting activity and harvest during the season.

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60-day, 3-zone Waterfowl Season will Open September 22 in Minnesota

July 31, 2012

60-day, 3-zone Waterfowl Season will Open September 22 in Minnesota

Waterfowl hunters in southern Minnesota will have additional late season hunting opportunities under a new three-zone, 60-day season announced today by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

Last year, the DNR split the state into two hunting zones with different season dates as part of an effort to provide additional hunting opportunity as birds migrate from north to south. The addition of a third zone furthers that approach.

“A third zone was supported in data collected as part of a hunter survey and a first-ever waterfowl hunter focus group,” said Tom Landwehr, DNR commissioner. “This will extend the hunting season in southern Minnesota through the first weekend in December, which will appeal to hunters where waters have not yet frozen and migrating birds are still coming through.”

The state’s waterfowl season will open one-half hour before sunrise on Sept. 22 statewide. The daily bag limit of six ducks per day and a 60-day season are unchanged from last year. The mallard bag limit remains at four per day, including two hen mallards. The wood duck bag limit will remain at three per day. The daily limit for scaup is four, up from two last year. Possession limits remain at twice the daily bag limits. Youth Waterfowl Day will be Sept. 8, two weeks before the season opener.

Dennis Simon, DNR wildlife chief, said this year’s opener is the earliest in 45 years. The Sept. 22 date was selected based on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service direction that enables states in the Mississippi Flyway to open their season on the Saturday nearest Sept. 24.

“The season opened on Sept. 24 last year,” said Simon, “That too was an earlier-than-normal opener. We saw hunter satisfaction levels rise last year due, in part, to good early season wood duck and blue-winged teal hunting.”

Duck season length is based on mallard counts from a continental survey, including Minnesota information. This year’s estimate was 11 million mallards, which was above the average of 8.1 million mallards and the second highest count since 1992. Steve Cordts, DNR waterfowl specialist, said breeding duck numbers for all species were very good this year. He noted wetland conditions in the major waterfowl breeding areas were drier than last year but still near long-term averages.

“The population index of local breeding mallards in Minnesota was at their long-term average of 225,000 breeding mallards this spring,” Cordt said. “Wetland conditions in Minnesota were drier this spring compared to last year, but improved in many areas in May and June.”

DUCK SEASON

In the North Duck Zone (north of Highway 210), duck season will run from Saturday, Sept. 22-Tuesday, Nov. 20.In the Central Duck Zone, duck season will run from Saturday, Sept. 22 to Sunday, Sept. 30 and Saturday, Oct. 6-Sunday, Nov. 25.In the South Duck Zone (south of Highway 212), duck season will run from Saturday, Sept. 22 to Sunday, Sept. 30 and Saturday, Oct. 13-Sunday, Dec. 2.Shooting hours will be from one half hour before sunrise to 4 p.m. daily through Saturday, Oct. 6, and from one half hour before sunrise to sunset the remainder of the season.Motorized decoys or other motorized devices designed to attract migratory waterfowl may not be used from the opening day of duck season through Saturday, Oct. 6. On water bodies and lands fully contained within state wildlife management area boundaries, a person may not use these devices at any time during the waterfowl season.

YOUTH WATERFOWL DAY

Youth Waterfowl Hunting Day will be Saturday, Sept. 8. Hunters age 15 and under may take regular season bag limits when accompanied by a non-hunting adult (age 18 and older, no license required). Ducks, Canada geese, mergansers, coots and moorhens may be taken from one half-hour before sunrise to 4 p.m. Motorized decoy restrictions are in effect. Five geese may be taken statewide. A free small game license and HIP-certification are required for youth age 15 and under.

GOOSE SEASONS

Early September Goose Season

The early Canada goose season will open statewide on Saturday, Sept. 1 and will run through Friday, Sept. 21. Bag limits for Canada geese will be five per day statewide.

A $4 permit is required to hunt Canada geese in the early season. Permits are available wherever hunting and angling licenses are sold. The restriction prohibiting hunting within 100 yards of surface water remains in effect in the Northwest goose zone, Carlos Avery WMA, Ocheda Lake Game refuge, and an area surrounding Swan Lake in Nicollet County. Early season goose hunters should consult the 2012 Waterfowl Supplement for zone maps and additional details.

Regular goose season

Minnesota’s regular goose season will open in conjunction with the duck season statewide on Saturday, Sept. 22 with a bag limit of three Canada geese per day the entire season. Goose season will be closed in the central and south duck zones when duck season is closed.
In the North Duck zone, goose season will run from Saturday, Sept. 22-Sunday, Dec.16. In the Central Duck zone, goose season will run from Saturday, Sept. 22-Sunday, Sept. 30 and Saturday, Oct. 6-Friday, Dec. 21. In the South Duck zone, goose season will run from Saturday, Sept. 22-Sunday, Sept. 30 and Saturday, Oct. 13-Friday, Dec. 28.

“Hunters can expect to see excellent numbers of Canada geese again this fall,” Cordts said. “The number of breeding geese in Minnesota is very high and local production was very good this spring. In addition, we should see good numbers of migrant geese in the state this fall, particularly in areas such as Lac qui Parle Wildlife Management Area.”

Other Goose Seasons

The season for light geese (snow, blue and Ross’ geese), white-fronted geese, and brant will run concurrent with open Canada goose season in each zone. Bag limits are 20 light geese per day, one white-fronted goose per day, and one brant per day.

Sandhill Crane Season

The season for sandhill cranes will open two weeks later this year and run from Saturday, Sept. 15-Sunday, Oct. 21 in the Northwest Goose zone only. The daily bag limit will be two sandhill cranes per day. A Sandhill crane permit ($3) is required in addition to a small game hunting license.

Additional details on the duck, goose, sandhill crane, and other migratory bird hunting seasons will be available in the 2012 Minnesota Waterfowl Hunting Regulations, available in mid-August.

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Intro to Deer Hunting August 21 in Denver, Colorado

July 31, 2012

Intro to Deer Hunting August 21 in Denver, Colorado

Longtime deer hunter Kent Ingram is joining with Colorado Parks and Wildlife to host an introductory seminar on hunting deer, Tuesday, Aug. 21 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Hunter Education building at the Denver office.  As part of the Hunter Outreach Program, this seminar seeks to educate and involve new hunters in the sport.

The tutorial will cover the fundamentals of habits and habitat of deer, hunting tactics and techniques, and provide a good beginning for the novice deer hunter.  Registration is limited to 75 participants.

WHO: Everyone interested in learning how to hunt deer

WHAT: Intro to deer hunting seminar

WHEN: Tues., Aug. 21, 2012 from 6 to 8 p.m.

WHERE: Hunter Education Building, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216

HOW:  To register please email wildlife.neoutreach@state.co.us or call 303-291-7804 and leave a message with name(s), address and phone number to register. There is no cost for this event.

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Sixty-day Duck Hunting Season Proposed in Mississippi Flyway

July 31, 2012

Sixty-day Duck Hunting Season Proposed in Mississippi Flyway

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) recently announced a proposed 60-day duck hunting season and six-duck daily bag limit for the upcoming 2012-13 late waterfowl season in the Mississippi Flyway, which extends across Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee and Wisconsin. The Service also proposed geese hunting season lengths and bag limits that vary by state and area.

The proposed late season waterfowl frameworks will appear in a mid-August edition of the Federal Register for public comment. States select their individual seasons from within the federal frameworks that establish the earliest beginning and latest ending dates and the maximum season length and bag limits.

A duck hunting season is proposed of not more than 60 days between September 22, 2012, and January 27, 2013. The proposed daily bag limit is six and may include no more than four mallards (two hens), three wood ducks, one mottled duck, two redheads, four scaup, two pintails, one black duck, and one canvasback. The proposed daily bag limit of mergansers is five, only two of which may be hooded mergansers. In states that include mergansers in the duck bag limit, the daily limit is the same as the duck bag limit, only two which may be hooded mergansers.

Generally, seasons for Canada goose would be held between September 22, 2012, and January 31, 2013, and vary in length among states and areas. States would be able to select seasons for light geese not to exceed 107 days with 20 geese daily between September 22, 2012, and March 10, 2013; for white-fronted geese the proposed season would not exceed 74 days with a two-bird daily bag limit or 88 days with a one-bird daily bag limit between September 22, 2012, and February 17, 2013; and for brant it would not exceed 70 days with a two-bird daily bag limit or 107 days with a one-bird daily bag limit between September 22, 2012, and January 31, 2012. There is no possession limit for light geese.

The Service’s 2012 Waterfowl Population Status Report summarizes information on the status of duck and goose populations and habitat conditions during spring of 2012. In the traditional survey area, which includes the north-central United States, south-central and northern Canada and Alaska, the 2012 total duck population estimate was 48.6 million birds, an increase of 7 percent over last year’s estimate. Despite poorer habitat conditions compared to 2011, population abundance estimates are good for this breeding season. The total pond estimate for prairie Canada and the US combined was 5.5 million, which is down 32 percent from last year.

The annual survey results guide the Service’s waterfowl conservation programs under authority of the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Each year the Service works in partnership with states from the four flyways to establish regulatory frameworks for waterfowl hunting season lengths, dates, and bag limits. All of this information represents the largest data set on any wildlife species group in the world and helps provide hunting opportunities while ensuring the long-term health of waterfowl populations.

The Status of Waterfowl report can be found at http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/. To view a video of the Status of Waterfowl video visit: http://flyways.us/status-of-waterfowl/video-report/.

The mission of the Service’s Migratory Bird Program is to ensure long-term ecological sustainability of migratory bird populations and their habitats for future generations, through careful monitoring, effective management, and by supporting national and international partnerships that conserve habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife.

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Introducing the Woodland Buck 3-D Target by Rinehart Targets

July 31, 2012

Introducing the Woodland Buck 3-D Target by Rinehart Targets

When it comes to creating the “Best archery targets in the world”, any archer will tell you hands down that Rinehart Targets is tough to beat.  And in these rough economic times, Rinehart was determined to create a 3D buck target that was ‘recession-proof’ yet still held up to the company’s high standards for long-lasting durability.  Enter the Woodland Buck 3-D Target.  At an unbeatable suggested retail price of just $159, the Woodland Buck by Rinehart can stand up to endless practice shots and the tightest of ‘target’ budgets.

You’ve drawn your tag and now it’s time to put in the practice hours, ensuring no shot is wasted come fall.  The new Woodland Buck is just the ticket for true-to-life practice featuring an alert-forward head, its body in semi-sneak position and big buck eight-point antlers.  Long-lasting durability is ensured with Rinehart’s newest innovative and strong Solid FX Foam™ technology completely molded from nose to tail with no fillers.  And while Rinehart’s newest Solid FX Foam ensures archers receive the best value for the price point, the core of the target is constructed of Rinehart’s Signature Solid Self-healing foam — ensuring it’ll outlast even your longest, hardest practice session.  Plus, like many of Rinehart’s award-winning targets, it features the company’s patented replaceable locking insert — once again saving archers time and money, without sacrificing quality of practice.

Performance and versatility were not left out of the equation when constructing the new Woodland Buck. Archers can practice shots from a wide variety of real-life angles, while its outlined vitals area helps with precision for incredible penetration and a clean, lethal shot.  Arrow removal is also incredibly simple— field points, broadheads or even expandables won’t damage or tear this target thanks again to Rinehart’s Signature Solid Self-healing
foam core.

While this buck boasts a simulated weight of a whopping 120lbs, it’s surprisingly lightweight so it can transport easily from your truck to your favorite practice spot and back.  And, because Rinehart never wants a little inclement weather to stand between bowhunters and their perfect shot, this rugged, weather-proof target is resistant to sun, moisture and extreme temperatures.

For more information about the new Woodland Buck Target — or Rinehart’s extensive line of
premium quality targets for bowhunters and competitive archers — contact Rinehart at 1809 Beloit Avenue, Janesville, WI 53546 • Telephone: (608) 757-8153 • Or visit www.rinehart3D.com

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California DFG Offers Special Dove Hunt Opportunities

July 31, 2012

California DFG Offers Special Dove Hunt Opportunities

The California Department of Fish and Game’s (DFG) Upland Game Bird Special Hunts Program is offering special dove hunt opportunities this year. Hunters who wish to hunt on properties with controlled access must apply for reservations by Aug. 8.

Sixteen special dove hunts are scheduled throughout California.

Participants will be determined by lottery. To allow a maximum number of hunters to participate, applicants and their party members may be drawn only once for all lottery dove hunts during the season. Duplicate applications will be disqualified. Dove season opens Sept. 1.

Hunters can apply online at http://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/DFGSpecialHunts/Default.aspx. To apply by mail, hunters must fill out the 2012 Upland Game Bird Stamp Special Hunts Dove application, which may be obtained at DFG regional offices.

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