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To Catch A Wolf – Part V

February 24, 2009

Link to Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV

If we are ever to consider “catching” a wolf, we need first to understand it. This has become a difficult task, especially here in the United States because most who advocate for wolves, seemingly those with all the money and resources to do so, aren’t at all interested in telling the truth about this animal. Why is it that in efforts to discover the truth about this large and sometimes vicious predator, advocates mount bigger campaigns to counter those truths with lies, information designed to mislead the public?

In the West we love our stories about Nikki: Dog of the North and Jack London’s other creation of Call of the Wild. In our romantic fantasies we want to be friends with canines that are portrayed as our best friends, cute and cuddly. The reality is wolves are none of these and there are many other myths that we have been programmed to believe as true. Read more

2009 Wild Turkey Bourbon Grand Nationals Finals

February 24, 2009

Senior Open

1. Jim Pollard, Charleston AR 453
2. Chris Parrish, Centralia MO 452
3. Sadler McGraw, Camden AL 446
4. Shane Hendershot, Zanesville OH 445
5. Mitchell Johnston, Purlear NC 444
6. Billy Yargus, Ewing MO 443
7. Mark Prudhomme, Georgetown SC 440
Doug Benefield, Newnan GA 440
8. Scott Ellis, Mulberry FL 439
Matthew Van Cise, Brookville PA 439
JR Lanham, Bunker MO 439
Josh Grossenbacher, Port Clinton OH 439
9. Kindell Keeton, Wilmington OH 437
10. Bradley Ruff, Elberton GA 432

Gobbling

1. Stephan Richardson, Springdale AR 226
2. Doug Benefield, Newnan GA 224
3. Scott Wilhelm, Chippewa Falls WI 224
4. Scott Ellis, Mulberry FL 220
5. Alex Vedrinski, Streetsboro OH 219

To Catch A Wolf – Part IV

February 23, 2009

Links to Part I, Part II, Part III, Part V.

Before we venture into some of the Scandinavian countries to examine how they dealt with wolves and wolf problems, let’s visit for a moment right here in the United States. It is believed that several subspecies of wolves inhabited much of the U.S. at one point in time.

Teddy Roosevelt went to great pains in some of his writings of the late 1800s in describing the different kinds of wolves he encountered all across the nation. He related colors, sizes, characteristics and habitats of any of these predators he came in contact with. One thing Roosevelt tells us is that even though he believed that man’s efforts to get rid of wolves certainly had a significant affect, he was convinced there was something more than man’s effort at hunting, trapping, poisons, etc. that wiped out wolf populations. Read more

To Catch A Wolf – Part III

February 21, 2009

Links to Part I and Part II and Part IV and Part V.

We have learned greatly from the previous writings that wolves were not only a real problem for people in many parts of the world but also the animal was despised and feared, mostly for justifiable reasons. We’ve discovered that often it was only the wealthy barons owning the resources to take up the hunt for the wolf, while the peasants were left to their own devices, sometimes their lives ending in death from wolf attacks against them.

They say necessity is the mother of invention and often out of the desperate act of survival the peasants created some ingenious contraptions to capture and kill wolves. Read more

To Catch A Wolf – Part II

February 21, 2009

If you missed part one of “To Catch a Wolf” you can find that at this link. This link for Part III. This link for Part IV and Part V.

As I mentioned in Part I of “To Catch a Wolf”, wolves are not easy game to hunt. As I surmised also, had Russia been interested enough or financially capable to employ a steady dose of decent wolf management, perhaps some of the tactics used by wolf hunters wouldn’t have become necessary. I’m referring to tactics that resulted in mass killings of wolves.

Needless to say, some day into the future, I’m sure that one way or another, the United States is going to be faced with a dilemma on what to do about too many wolves. Initial plans are being made in some states (I mentioned Idaho in Part I) as to what rules will govern the wolf hunts if they are ever removed from protection. As in Idaho’s case, the rules essentially ban every means of hunting except for a man and his rifle. Historic documents tell us that this will not work. Initial wolf hunts may see some results but once the crafty canine discovers he is being hunted, one man and one rifle will not be any challenge to the wolf. Read more

To Catch A Wolf – Part I

February 19, 2009

Link to Part II
Link to Part III
Link to Part IV
Link to Part V

To be frank, there exists today very few people who have first hand knowledge on how to hunt a wolf. Wolf hunting many years ago became quite popular for a myriad of reasons, from the thrill of the adrenaline pumping danger to a matter of survival.

Today in America we talk of when the day comes, if ever, that the wolf we be taken off the list of protected species and man will once again be able to hunt this animal. We, including myself, often speak of the “Disneyesque” perception people today have of the wolf. I think the same can be said, at least to some degree, about how sportsmen are going to “hunt” the wolf when the time comes.

As a game management tool, specifically a population control measure, hunting has been a socially acceptable and scientifically viable means of accomplishing that task, however, I’m not so sure that we understand the difficulties we will be presented with in hunting this intelligent and highly adaptable beast. Read more


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